Duchess of Devonshire the diamond - brillant diadem Duchess of Devonshire the diamond - brillant diadem Duchess of Devonshire the diamond - brillant diadem Duchess of Devonshire the diamond - brillant diadem Duchess of Devonshire the diamond - brillant diadem Duchess of Devonshire the diamond - brillant diadem Duchess of Devonshire the diamond - brillant diadem Duchess of Devonshire the diamond - brillant diadem Duchess of Devonshire the diamond - brillant diadem Duchess of Devonshire the diamond - brillant diadem Duchess of Devonshire the diamond - brillant diadem

Oben ein Bild des herrlichen Derby Diadems, der Herzogin von Devonshire


Her Grace Deborah Vivien Cavendish, Dowager Duchess of Devonshire (born March 31, 1920), née Deborah Freeman-Mitford, is the last of the noted Mitford sisters.She married Andrew Cavendish, 11th Duke of Devonshire in 1941.

The formidable Duchess turning a pensive gaze towards the viewer, wears the derby diadem together with a lot of the Devonshire pearls, and the Zenobia-costume from Worth,Paris, which the 8th Duchess of Devonshire,Louise, wore at the famous Devonshire Diamand Jubilee House Ball in the 1897.

The tiara rests on a band of pairs of stylized buds between collet-set diamonds, surmounted by a sequence of palmettes outlined by diamond borders linked at the base to lotus flowers graduated toward the back,in total ca 1900 diamonds.
The design is made in 1802 by Skinner of Orchard Street for the Duchess of Devonshire, who was presumably given this tiara at the time of her marriage in 1889. Since then the tiara has descended through three generations.

An articel written by the Duchess in the Sunday Telegraph from March 17, 2002, described her own behaviour when wearing so much glitter:

“Before the last war, tiaras were worn by married women at all the grand balls in London. Even at a big dance in the 1960s it was not uncommon for men to wear tail-coats and the women their jewels.
I remember going to a such an entertainment on my own wearing, with unwonted confidence, the "big" tiara (the Devonshires have two).
It must have looked rather odd, because my home-made dress of cotton broderie anglaise was definitely not up to it. At the end of the evening I went out to look for a taxi. It never occurred to me that it might not be a good idea to stand alone in the street long after midnight with a load of diamonds round my neck and nineteen hundred more glittering above my head.

But then, even though Helen, Duchess of Northumberland, once had her tiara snatched off her head as she was leaving her house in Eaton Square, we did not think of being mugged (the word did not exist).

My mother-in-law, Mary Devonshire, who was Mistress of the Robes to The Queen from 1953 till 1967, used to fetch the jewels from the bank stowed in a Marks& Spencer carrier bag.

My grandmother-in-law, Evelyn, Duchess of Devonshire, was Mistress of the Robes to Queen Mary for 43 years from 1910. Together she and Queen Mary weathered long hours of tiara-ed evenings.
After one particularly lengthy engagement, Granny was heard to say "the Queen has been complaining about the weight of her tiara . . . the Queen doesn't know what a heavy tiara is".
Evelyn knew what she was talking about. The larger of the two Devonshire diamond tiaras is indeed a whopper. It was made in 1893 for Louise, the eighth Duke of Devonshire's wife. She was formerly married to the Duke of Manchester and was always known as the Double Duchess..........”source:Sunday Telegraph

Special Thanks to Mel!

Another picture of the late Duchess wearing the derby diadem and her jewels.

Chatsworth has been home to the Earls and Dukes of Devonshire since the 1500s. The collection of the Dukes, spans over 500 years and includes magnificent jewelry, Renaissance art and so much more. Featured artists include Canaletto, considered the finest view painter of the 18th Century.

The 8th Duke and his family had a passion to collect mementos from the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria and sporting events, such as the Ascot Gold Cup, taking the collection down another path.

What is a Dukedom without jewelry and this collection includes some fine pieces.
In 18th and 19th Century England one of the favored styles was to wear a stomacher, which was usually in a triangle shape, worn on the bodice and usually extended below the lady's waist. Hancock made in 1856, a unique parure with intaglio,gems, pearls and gold for the Duchess, a Stomacher is part of a parure in medieval style, fascinating and fabulous.

Now part of the Duke of Devonshire and Trustees of the Chatsworth Settlement.


 

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