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Rosa Topas Schmuck| Pink Topas

Eine Erklärung führt den Namen auf das Sanskrit-Wort tapas zurück, das „Feuer“ oder „Leuchten“ bedeutet.

Im Jahre 1740 wurde ein Topas, der so genannte Braganza-Diamant, im Glauben, es handele sich um einen echten Diamanten, in die portugiesische Krone eingesetzt.

Für die begehrten rosa oder Pink Topase wurde die ursprünglich gelben "imperial" Topase erhitzt, jedoch ist ein bestimmtes Chrom dazu nötig, den Edelstein von gelb auf pink zu färben, ist dies nicht im Stein vorhanden, färbt sich der Topas weiss und ist wertlos.

Der Tsar Alexander I. von Russland hatte ebenfalls einige der begehrten natürlichen pink Topase. Eine Garnitur mit diesen Edelsteinen erhielt die Marchioness von Londonderry zum Geschenk von ihm.


Pink Topaz | Famous historic Londonderry Jewels

Imperial topaz, a rich golden gem discovered near Ouro Preto, Minas Gerais, Brazil, in 1735, forever changed the image of topaz and captured the hearts of jewelry connoisseurs, Instead of the known yellow, tan or pale blue gem, this "imperial" topaz had highlights of rippling pink, orange and red. Not long afterward, a Parisian jeweler named Dumelle found that the topaz turned a beautiful pink when heated. "Pinked" and imperial topaz quickly became favorites in late-18th century jewelry.

The popularity of gemstones depends on prevailing taste, and pink topaz faded from favor around 1850, although imperial topaz was used occasionally in jewelry of the late 19th century.

Around 1900, pink topaz made a comeback as Edwardian socialites vied to display the finest, most expensive and most unusual jewels.

A few superb examples, such as the pink topaz pendant illustrated here, once owned by the Marchioness of Londonderry, demonstrate how lovely this gem can be. The revival was short-lived, and pink topaz never rose to the level of demand it had in the 1830s.

It's easy to understand why there's so little pink topaz on the market, given that it's been produced traditionally by heating imperial topaz, which has a high market value itself.
Cost of material aside, there are significant risks. The trace element chromium turns imperial topaz pink, but not all imperial topaz contains chromium. Without this element, the topaz may become colorless when heated. In addition, certain inclusions may expand when heated, producing fractures and rendering the gem less valuable.

On a hopeful note, a deposit of fine pink to purplish pink topaz was found in Pakistan in the early 1970s. Although some of this naturally occurring pink topaz has been brought to market, it's still rare. Perhaps as more of it is recovered, we'll see a new chapter in the history of pink topaz jewelry.


There are also some rare original pink Russian topaz, from the vault of the Tsar of Russia of unusually intense colour.

This Russian pink topaz was given by Tsar Alexander I to Frances Anne, Marchioness of Londonderry in 1821.

The stone formed part of a set of graduated pink topazes worn by Lady Londonderry on the front of her robes at the Coronation of William IV in 1830.

It was later remounted with diamonds as a pendant by the Crown jewellers Garrard, possibly to mark the accession of the seventh Marquess of Londonderry on 8th February 1915.

A yellow diamond of oval form was also given by Tsar Alexander I to Frances Anne, Marchioness of Londonderry. The stone was later mounted as a brooch with a diamond-set Greek key border.

source: wartski


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SCHMUCK mit Topas kaufen - verkaufen :::: rotes Faberge Ei - Werkmeister V.Meyer :::: Siegelringe

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