Rosebery Jewels | Hannah Rothschild| Countess of Rosebery| Primrose| Wedding Gifts noble jewel history MARRIAGE OF LORD ROSEBERY Countess hannah DE ROTHSCHILD | Primrose|Noble Wedding Jewelry Rosebery Jewels | Hannah Rothschild| Countess of Rosebery| Primrose| Wedding Gifts noble jewel history MARRIAGE OF LORD ROSEBERY Countess hannah DE ROTHSCHILD | Primrose|Noble Wedding Jewels Rosebery Jewels | Hannah Rothschild| Countess of Rosebery| Primrose| Wedding Gifts noble jewel history MARRIAGE OF LORD ROSEBERY Countess hannah DE ROTHSCHILD | Primrose|Noble Wedding Jewelry countess rosebery Primrose hannah de rothschild Rosebery Jewels | Hannah Rothschild| Countess of Rosebery| Primrose| Wedding Gifts noble jewel history MARRIAGE OF LORD ROSEBERY Countess hannah DE ROTHSCHILD | Primrose|Noble Wedding Jewelry countess rosebery Primrose hannah de rothschild Rosebery Jewels | Hannah Rothschild| Countess of Rosebery| Primrose| Wedding Gifts noble jewel history MARRIAGE OF LORD ROSEBERY Countess hannah DE ROTHSCHILD | Primrose|Noble Wedding Jewelry countess rosebery Primrose hannah de rothschild countess rosebery Primrose hannah de rothschild Rosebery Jewels | Hannah Rothschild| Countess of Rosebery| Primrose| Wedding Gifts noble jewel history MARRIAGE OF LORD ROSEBERY Countess hannah DE ROTHSCHILD | Primrose|Noble Wedding Jewelry countess rosebery Primrose hannah de rothschild Rosebery Jewels | Hannah Rothschild| Countess of Rosebery| Primrose| Wedding Gifts noble jewel history MARRIAGE OF LORD ROSEBERY Countess hannah DE ROTHSCHILD | Primrose|Noble Wedding Jewelry

Countess Rosebery | Primrose Juwelen Schmuck| Hannah Rothschild|Hochzeit

Hochzeitsgeschenke Hochzeit Trauung Hannah Rothschild mit dem Earl of Rosebery .


Rosebery Jewels | Hannah Rothschild| Countess of Rosebery| Primrose| Wedding Gifts noble jewel history



MARRIAGE OF LORD ROSEBERY AND MISS DE ROTHSCHILD


The marriage of the Earl of Rosebery to Miss Hannah de Rothschild took place on 20th March 1878 , the civil ceremony being performed at the register office in Mount Street, Grosvenor Square, and the religions service Christ Church, Mayfair, in the preserve of a large and fashionable company.

Long before the time fixed for the ceremony at the church a large concourse of people, largely composed of ladies, had assembled before the family mansion in Piccadilly, to witness the departure of the bridal party. Down Street, in which the church is situated, was also lined with people.
The bridegroom and his best man arrived early, and about twenty-five minutes to twelve were followed by the Earl of Beaconsfield in a pair-horse brougham. His lordship was cheered as he stepped out of his carriage.
The bride, accompanied Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild, was the next arrive, and was shortly afterwards followed by the Marchioness of Harrington. Soon afterwards carriage and pair dashed along Down Street, and the Prince of Wales was immediately recognised and his presence cordlialy acknowledged.

Piccadilly, the immediate neighbourhood of the Rothschild mansion, was now crowded with carriages and spectators. The latter were kept well order without much trouble by a contingent of police. These acted throughout with great forbearance, notwithstanding that their temper must have been sorely tried by the persistent endeavours of the throng of ladies who appeared particularly anxious to occupy the roadway.

At the civil ceremony Lord Leconfield, Lord Lascelles, Lord Carington, and many relatives and friends of the two families were present.

The wedding ceremony at Christ Church, see above in the picture, was appointed to take place at a quarter to twelve, and long before that time those who had received invitations to be present began to assemble. The passages and the space in front of the altar rails were carpeted with crimson cloth, but otherwise the edifice presented its usual appearance.

The Duke of Cambridge occupied seat the pew directly facing the altar, and amongst others who were present were the Duke of Cleveland, Earl Stanhope, the Marquess of Hartington, Lord Leconfield, Mr Christopher Sykes, M.P., Mr M’Lagan, M.P., Sir Couttsand Lady Lindsay, Lord Colville, the Hon. E. Stanhope, M.P., and the Hon. E. Primrose.

In the interval of waiting, an allegretto from Mendelssohn’s Lobgesang. The Earl of Rosebery, accompanied by the best man (Captain Tyrwhit), entered the church shortly after halfpast eleven, and took up his position on the south side of the reserved space in front of the communion rails.

The Rev. William Rogers, vicar of Bishopsgate, entered the sacrarium few minutes subsequently, and almost immediately afterwards the arrival of the bridal party was announced by the simultaneous rising of the whole assemblage.

The bride wore a white satin dress, trimmed with Brussels lace flounces, between which were rows of orange blossoms, a magnificent veil of Brussels lace and wreath of orange blossoms. Her only ornaments were earrings of pearls and brilliants.

The youthful bridesmaids, the Misses Euphemia and Helen Lindsay, daughters of Sir Coutts Lindsay, the Hon. Emily Stanhope, daughter of Earl Stanhope, and the Hon. Mary Caroline Wyndham, daughter of Lord Leconfield,. They were attired dressesmade the style of Louis XVI. period—composed of white Sicilian, with long waistcoats richly embroidered in white silk, and ruffles of old lace ; white silk hats of the same period, trimmed with marabout feathers and embroidery. Each of the bridesmaids wore gold pendant with monogram in rubies and diamonds ( each of the four bridesmaids a splendid monogram pendant, bearing the letters H in diamonds and R in rubies.), the gift of the bridegroom.

The Earl of Beaconsfield escorted the bride to the altar, being followed by the bridesmaids and other members the bridal party. At the altar steps the Premier passed to the left of the bride, leaving Lord Rosebery on her right hand, and the officiating clergyman at once commenced the marriage service of the Church of England.

The responses to the interrogations addressed to the bridegroom and bride respectively were given in a very low tone, and then, in answer to the inquiry whom the bride was given away, Lord Beaconsfield turned to his fair neighbour and placed her hand in that of the bridegroom, who. giving the ring to the clergyman, received it back and placed it upon his bride’s filler. Mr Rogers passed through the sacrarium rails, and had just joined the hands of the newly-wedded couple, declaring them man and wife, when the Prince of Wales entered the church and proceeded to the pew which the Duke of Cambridge seated, the time originally fixed for the ceremony not having yet been reached. The benediction having been pronounced, Mendelssohn’s “Wedding March was played by Signor llandegger as the bridal partv retired to vestry.

The bride and bridegroom received the cordial congratulations of their many friends they passed down the aisle to the porch, whence they drove to the bride’s residence in Piccadilly.

After the wedding breakfast the Earl and Countess left town for Petworth House, Lord Leconfield’s Sussex residence. They will afterwards visit Scotland, and thence go on the continent.

The presents are varied and costly.

Prominent among them stand the Rosebery jewels, which were given by the noble bridegroom to his bride:
The Rosebery family jewels, consist of a complete parure of ancient diamonds, in their original setting, comprising a tiara comb, collet, pear shaped ear-rings, and cross of brillants:


Historically prominent, as well as artistically beautiful, in this central display of presents from the Earl to Miss de Rothschild are the exquisite box of enamelled gold, surmounted by a portrait of Marie Antoinette, a painted fan which belonged to that unfoitunate Queen, and an old Italian mirror, with pair of candlesticks, the silver work being elaborate and minute.


They are scarcely excelled in beauty by the more modern collection diamonds, also presented his lordship, which form a large diadem, three-row necklace, pair of cluster earrings, two bracelets—one a copy of Mary, Queen of Scots,” being two hearts tied with a lover’s knotted other three rows of single stones.

(a new parure of brilliants formed a tiara ot large stones, a double heart bracelet, with two drop-shaped stones; a bracelet of three rows, a necklace of three rows, with clusters at the side and back; and pair of ear-rings).


The pearl necklace of five rows is a most extraordinary collection of large round lustrous pearls, and accompanying it are the snap being a portion of the family diamonds.

Diamond and pearl cluster bracelet, brooch, and earrings, en suite>>
Pearls and Diamond Tiara, the 7 drop pearls, with diamond borders form 7 brooches at pleasure. The Earl of Rosebury, purchased the jewels two days before the wedding from the jeweller Hennell, which is recorded in the Rosebery Archives.


Diamond eglantine spray brooch and earrings, which complete the set.
His lordship’s presents also comprise a boquet of roses and rosebuds like "rose and berry" , which, we believe, was the engaged present;

A pendant containing a very large and deep-coloured sapphire and fine pearl set in brilliants, with pearl drop.

Four half hoop rings, sapphire, diamond, emerald, and ruby;


the Countess of Rosebery, four rose-leaf brooches in brilliants;

 

Baron Lionel de Rothschild has presented an antique aigrette, with a large sapphire and a plume of diamonds;
Sir Nathaniel de Rothschild, brilliant pansy brooch (brilliant rosebud brooch) ;
Mr Alfred de Rothschild, a pink pearl and diamond bracelet, the centre stone of which is large and symmetrical pink pearl ;
Mr Leopold de Rothschild, a gold and agate etui ;
Mrs Cohen, grandmother of the bride -two ruby and brilliant brooches in the form of primroses, with earrings and hair pins suite;


Mr Johu Samuel, her uncle and guardian, large brooch of fine rubies and diamonds brooch of the same character as her grandmother;
the Misses Cohen, her aunts, a pair of sapphire and diamond earrings sapphire and diamond ornaments.
the Baroness de Rothschild, of Vienna, a pendant of pearls and diamonds>>;
Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild, a pair of diamond and ruby star earrings;
Miss Alice, a brooch fn ;
the Baron and Baroness Alphonse de Rothschild,a pair of old classic snake earrings in diamonds and pearls;
the Baroness Charles de Rothschild, a diamond marguerite bracelet;
Sir Anthony and Lady Rothschild, a diamond and pearl spray, and antique marguerite of large pearls and brilliants ;
the Baroness Willy de Rothschild, a emerald and brilliant snake brooch;
the Baroness James de Rothschild, turquoise and diamond fly brooch-pendant;
the Baroness Adolphe de Rothschild, a diamond and pearl flower brooch;
the Baroness Edmond de Rothschild, a diamond bouquet holder, a spray of orange blossom beeing already place therein ;
the Baroness Gustave de Rothschild, a collier of pearls with diamond mounted tassels-necklace of small pearls, with diamond capped tassels;
Mr George Samuel, three large turquoises surrounded by brilliants;
Mr and Mrs Cyril Flower, a butterfly of cat’s-eye and brilliants;
Mrs Henderson, an antique enamel and diamond tablet;
Miss Samuel, an ivory and jewel-mounted parasol;
tenants on the Mentmore Estate, a diamond pendant;

Lord Leconfield, a pair of large brilliant diamond earrings;
Lady Leconfield, a neck jewel of amethyst and diamonds, with cypher of small brilliants
their children, a pair of silver gilt and ruby glass scent bottles;
the Earl of Leacnsfield, a turquoise and diamond ring;
Captain the Hon. E. Primrose, silver necklace and earrings, a diamond brooch in form of the word “Hannah ”and a silver mounted sandal wood fan ;
Lady Mary Primrose, a gold and pearl flexible bracelet:
the cottagers Postwick, silver bracelet; and
the children at Cheddington school, gold and pearl band pencil case.
The following ladies and gentlemen have also presented jewellery Mrs A. de Mocatta, Lady Harcourt, Mrs Dugdale. Baroness George de Worms, Mr Townley, Sir James Hudson, Lady Lindsay, Miss Higgins, Mrs Edward Ellice, Lady Salomans, the Countess of Antrim, Mrs Sibeon, Lord and Hon. M. Gerard, Viscount New- Port, Mrs Arthur Sassoon, Lady Godolphin-Elphinstone, Miss Touneley, Mr Lionel Cohen, Captain and Mrs Niven, Mr Dun das, and Lady Rachel Butler.

The other presents are also very numerous, and include valuable specimens of almost every art and manufacture, books, pictures, cutlery, vases, goblets, caskets, mirrors, &c., almost without number. Those that attract most attention are a very magnificent silver dish, of exquisite form and workmanship, presented by the Duke of Cleveland, ana a silver vase and stand of imposing proportions, with a pair of handsome silver claret decanters, all beautifully chased, which were given to bliss Rothschild by the tenantry on the Scotch estates, with address expressive of their regard. Lord and Lady Lansdowne have given a velvet-covered blottingbook, with large silver shield richly embossed on the cover ; the Earl and Countess Stanhope, five handsome porcelain jars in white and blue; the Countess of Harrington, a mirror with Dresden china frame; the Countess of Orkney, a gold enamel scent bottle; the Marchioness of Tavistock, a silver and blue velvet blotting-book; the Duchess of Bedford, a silver gilt inkstand ; the Hon. Mrs Eliot Torke, a silver filagree framed mirror; Mr and Mrs Cazenove, a silver gilt coffee service; Miss Emma Goldsmid, a cornelian turquoise and gold writing set, with pens and inkstand; Mrs Gerard Leigh, a gold enamel casket Mr and Mrs Markham, a silver inkstand; Mr B. Primrose, a gilt card tray; Mrs Cavendish Bentinck, a silver filagree casket; Lady Waterpark, a silver incense stand ; the Misses Ouvry, a silver cup; Miss Eliza Edwards, silver inkstand and tray; and Mrs F. Barrett, a hand some calf-bound copy of Shakespeare’* works; Bel- Mont, of New York, a large silver tea service ; Lord Rosebery’s tenantry, an elegant ormolu clock with china panels, and vase; Messrs Peach & Steel, three pairs of splendidly ornamented steel scissors in case; the Leighton tradespeople, an extremely pretty tea service ; Mrs Cohen’s servants, four silver gilt apostle spoons ; and to mark their appreciation for the character of their young mistress, the servants in the mansions Mentmore and Piccadilly have presented her with a flower-stand of glass, the silver stem forming a bouquet of leaves and flowers. Though not quite so fortunate his bride the matter of presents, Lord Rosebery has not been entirely forgotten, and in addition to their value many of lordship’s presents possess the excellent qualification of usefulness. Among them are Louis XVI. dressing case, richly ornamented in silver, with Oriental topaze clasp, and ail fittings of old and quaint French workmanship, the gift of the Prince of Wales ; a large silver punchbowl of the days of Dr Johnson, given by the Sykes Club ; large silver inkstand, by the Duchess of Cleveland; a large silver bowl, by Lord Carington ; a group of two spirited horses in oxydised silver, Viscount Barrington ; a silver and glass flowerbasket, Lord and Lady Aveland; chased gilt ash tray, Lord Effingham ; silver elongated oval box, with rrpouxsd figures on lid, the Karl of Jersey; a pair of grotesque ash trays, Lord Lambton : a tall terra-cotta pitcher, with broad silver rim, by the Countess of Hopetoun; chased silver massive tray, by Sir Frederick Johnstone; large ivory paper-knife, with and coronet engraved on the handle, by Lady Colville; gold inkstand and tray, by Viscount Falmouth ; a pair of silver gilt richly chased candlesticks, by Mr Mossop ; box containing hair and clothes brushes, with silver repouui backs, by Miss Lucy Cohen ; table garniture of gold filagree, bv Clare Vyner; three large Oriental Pearl shirt studs, by Mr John Samuel; silver inkstand, by Mr Christopher Sykes; a Queen Anne loving cup in silver, Miss Cohen; an old Cromwell pouringer, much interest and ouaintness, by Mr F. Maitland, Mr C. E. Boyle, ana Mr C. C. Coles ; and a large case of cutlery of superior design and workmanship, bearing on the handles the Rosebery crest, by Messrs Peach & Steel.

The church was crowded; and after the ceremony most of the friends met at the bride's residence in Piccadilly to breakfast before their departure for Sussex for their honeymoon.

Sources: Sotheby's Noble Jewels;Durham County Advertiser;Habeiage Of Lobs Bosebbet Derbyshire Advertiser;

 

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