Archiv der Kategorie: Noble Jewels

Noble Jewels | Royal Jewellery | Imperial tsar Jewel historic history

Diana Princess of Wales ‚Travolta‘ dress by Victor Edelstein, 1985

Shortly before her death in August 1997, Diana requested that the dress be sold in a charity auction. Florida-based businesswoman Maureen Dunkel bought it for £100,000 in New York in June 1997, along with nine other dresses formerly owned by the Princess.

The Travolta dress was the most expensive one sold at the auction. When she went bankrupt in 2011, Dunkel was forced to put them up for auction, but the Travolta dress was one of six that were not sold It was finally auctioned off by Kerry Taylor in London on 19 March 2013, fetching £240,000 ($362,424) and again being the most expensive auctioned dress. It was bought by „a British gentleman as a surprise to cheer up his wife“.

In 2019, it sold for £264,000 ($325,317) to Historic Royal Palaces a charity which looks after royal memorabilia including clothing and artifacts. The dress has joined the Royal Ceremonial Dress Collection and belongs to the palace.

Diana Princess of Wales| Sapphire Brooch Necklace Pearl Choker Collier
Diana Princess of Wales| Sapphire Brooch Necklace Pearl Choker Collier

Designed for the Princess by fashion designer Victor Edelstein, this striking midnight blue dress is now on public display at Kensington Palace to celebrate the reopening of the palace this summer.

The midnight blue velvet gown became legendary when the Princess wore it to a White House Gala in 1985 and took to the dancefloor with John Travolta.  Images of the Princess and the Hollywood actor dancing together made headlines around the world, securing a place in fashion history for the stunning gown

Following over four months of closure during lockdown, Kensington Palace will be reopening its doors once more to welcome visitors from Thursday, 30 July. To celebrate the re-opening, the famous ‘Travolta dress’, worn by the late Diana, Princess of Wales, will go on display at the palace for the first time since it was acquired by Historic Royal Palaces at auction in 2019.

The midnight blue velvet gown, designed by Victor Edelstein, became legendary when the Princess wore it to a White House Gala in 1985 and took to the dance floor with John Travolta.  Images of the Princess and the Hollywood actor dancing together made headlines around the world, securing a place in fashion history for the stunning gown.  In 2019, it was acquired by independent charity Historic Royal Palaces and has somewhat fittingly been in conservation ‘quarantine’ ever since, to protect it for posterity.  Like Kensington Palace itself, the dress is now coming out of isolation, and will be on display at the Princess’s former home this Summer for visitors to enjoy.

Famously the birthplace of Queen Victoria, Kensington Palace has been a royal residence for over 300 years.  Lavish Georgian parties were held within its spectacular state apartments in the eighteenth century.  A hundred years later, in 1837, a young Princess Victoria woke up at the palace to the news of her accession to the throne.  In recent years the palace has been home to Princess Margaret – sister of HM Queen Elizabeth II – and Diana, Princess of Wales.  It is currently the London home of TRH The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

The palace closed in March 2020 in response to the Covid-19 pandemic and has since been quiet, with the shutters of its famous galleries closed to protect the remarkable collections on display.  Palaces staff have returned to Kensington this week to gradually ‘reawaken’ the palace and install and array of new measures to ensure returning visitors feel safe.  Hand sanitiser dispensers and social distancing signage have been installed across the site.  Visitors are asked to book in advance, to help Historic Royal Palaces manage capacity, so visitors can enjoy their time at court with plenty of space.  The State Apartments and the rooms Queen Victoria grew up in will both be open, with visitors asked to follow a one-way route through the palace.

Historic Royal Palaces, the independent charity that cares for Kensington Palace, is hoping visitors will show their support for its national treasures by returning for a visit this Summer.  The charity is dependent on visitor income and facing a £98 million shortfall in its finances following the pandemic.  The return of visitors will make a vital contribution to the charity’s work caring for Kensington Palace and sharing its stories with the public.

Sam Owen, Head of Kensington Palace, said,

‘We are delighted to be welcoming visitors back to the palace again this Thursday.  Kensington Palace was built to be enjoyed by hundreds of people and it’s been sad to see it so quiet over the past couple of months.  Myself and the team can’t wait to welcome visitors back again and give them a suitably royal welcome.  We’ve never needed their support more – each visit is an important contribution to help us maintain this wonderful building for generations to come.’

Diana Princess of Wales Sapphire and Diamond Cluster Brooch Choker| Royal Jewels History

Diana Princess of Wales Sapphire and Diamond Choker | Russian Cluster Brooch | Gift of Elizabeth the Queen Mother to Diana Spencer

Countess of Bathurst | Royal Gifts and Wedding Prestents | Nobel Dimonds & Royal Jewel History

Countess of Bathurst | Royal Gifts and Wedding Prestents | Nobel und Royal Jewel History
Countess of Bathurst | Royal Gifts and Wedding Presents | Nobel and Royal Jewel History

A BRIDE’S TROUSSEAU.

The trousseau of Miss Lilias Borthwick, of which we had a glimpse yesterday, is the perfection of dainty simplicity| November 1893

The gown both for day and evening wear depend on for their effect their perfect cut, rather than on costliness of material. The trousseau includes several useful tailor-built gowns, one of navy serge with open jacket worn over a fawn-coloured Tattersall vest; another of gendarme blue home-spun, and third of brown-fleoked Scotch tweed, which is being made near the bride’s Highland home by a lady who enjoys the patronage of Royalty, was specially charmed with Cuttle Russian coat of gendarme blue cloth, with big square collar and revers sable and quaint strap fastenings on the bodice. The basque was attached to a ribbon belt fastened with buckle of oxidized silver. Cozy wrap of fawnooloured serge was lined through with gray squirrel fur and bordered with soft brown bear fur. The high collar was cut in one with the cloak.

Quaint Spanish buttons of old silver were used on the bodice of useful little gown black diagonal with bands of crimson velvet the skirt and a crimson velvet vest.

For her wedding journey tho Isle of Wight the future Lady Bathurst has selected dress and coat of brown hopsack tweed. The skirt has border of mink and a band petunia-coloured mirror velvet covered with brown passementerie. The bodice has square yoke back and front of the petunia velvet, edged with passementerie. Both coat and skirt are lined with petunia-red shot silk. A large picture hat of brown velvet with plumes of ostrich tips on the left side is to be worn with the dress. Most the future Countess Bathurst’s evening gowns are guiltless of trains, these appendages not being much approved by the sensible and practical young lady.

Among these gowns is a charming dinner dress of white silk, powdered with tiny pink flowers. The hem flounce is run on green and pink baby ribbon, which is knotted here and there, and the bodice and Empire sash are trimmed with gold enamel trimming. A dainty gown of blue moiré has the skirt trimmed with donkey ear bows blue velvet and bands of velvet covered with passementerie of white and colored pearls, the bands forming deep point in front. Another evening dress of de Nil armor silk, with a double flounce of embroidered chiffon arranged pagoda-wise the skirt.

A very pretty Whatteau tea gown in light yellow, has points caught with a rosette on the train and the slight train falls from 8 rosettes between the shoulders. A charming little tea gown in rise pink Lilac silk has full front the silk circled with a quaint chain girdle and clasps of oxidized silver. Dainty dressing gowns, heaps of pretty lingerie, and a variety of headgear were among the wedding finer v displayed in the young bride’s pretty sitting room near the top of Sir Algernon’s high house in Piccadilly, the windows which command magnificent view over the green park.

 

Above in the picture: Lilias, Countess Bathurst

The most valuable piece from the collection of Countess Bathurst, is an early 20th Century Diamond Tiara, commissioned from Cartier by Lilias, Countess Bathurst (1871-1965).

Made from  old and rose-cut diamonds, silver and gold, (circa 1910) the stones were taken from two tiaras,  Countess Bathurst inherited from her mother Lady Glenesk.

The tiara and the preceding corsage brooch, is the epitome of aristocratic splendor and the delicate Belle Époque scrolling motifs were inspired by 18th century architectural details.

Compared to many Victorian tiaras with their often heavy style of mounting and high surmounts this early 20th century example must have felt comparatively ethereal, and it is not surprising that Gloria Bathurst clearly enjoyed wearing it and was photographed wearing this beautiful head ornament on various grand occasions.

 

Lilias Countess of Bathurst | Cartier Diamond Stomacher and Cartier Diamonds Tiara | Nobel Diamonds & Royal Jewel History

Countess of Bathurst | Gloria Bathurst |Royal Gifts | Nobel Heirlooms Diamonds & Royal Jewel History

Lilias Countess of Bathurst | Natural Pearl and Diamond Tiara | Important Pearls, Diamonds & Royal Jewel History

Lilias Countess of Bathurst | Queen Anne Pearl Necklace | Historic Natural Pearl | Nobel Diamonds & Royal Jewel History

Lilias Countess of Bathurst | Diamond Brooch of large Diamonds| Nobel Diamonds & Royal Jewel History

 

 

 

Florence J. Gould | Important Jewels| Blue Princess Sapphire

Florence J. Gould Blue Princess Sapphire Necklace and important jewels
Florence J. Gould Blue Princess Sapphire Necklace and important jewels

Florence Gould, a patron of the arts, died in her villa on the Mediterranean in 1983. She was 87 years old.

Mrs. Gould had moved to the villa after the death of her husband, Frank Jay Gould, in 1956. She was born in San Francisco, the daughter of Maximilien Lacaze, a French publisher who made his fortune in the United States. She interrupted her career as an opera singer in 1923 when she married Mr. Gould, who was the son of Jay Gould, the American railroad magnate.

When Florence J. Gould, a patron of the arts and daughter-in-law of the railroad magnate Jay Gould, was 80 years old, she packed most of her jewelry and went to Japan and Southeast Asia.

The necklaces, rings, bracelets, earrings, brooches and clips she took with her on that 1976 trip, jewelry now valued at about $8 million, will be auctioned next Wednesday at Christie’s.

“She let all the women in a geisha house try on her jewels,“ Daniel Wildenstein, the art dealer, recalled of an incident he witnessed as her companion on that journey. He was wary, he said, but Mrs. Gould was not, and “she was proven right – all the jewels came back.“

In Cambodia, Mrs. Gould, generously decked out in gems, traveled by elephant to see the temples of Angkor. On another occasion, Mrs. Gould, wearing rings on her fingers and jewels at her throat, rode off into the Cambodian jungle in a pedicab with only a guide.

“She was full of diamonds,“ Mr. Wildenstein recalled, adding that he feared for the safety of his friend and client.

“I was certain she’d never arrive alive. She wasn’t the least bit afraid. Of course, all was well.“ Mrs. Gould’s jewelry remained intact on that trip, and she wore most of it frequently at El Patio, her villa at Cannes, until her death at 87, a year ago. The bulk of the extraordinary jewelry holdings of the widow of Frank Jay Gould – he was Jay Gould’s youngest child and a real-estate tycoon who developed Juan-les- Pins on the Riviera – will be on view all this weekend and through next Tuesday at Christie’s, Park Avenue at 59th Street.

 

Not all of Mrs. Gould’s jewelry is in this sale – some pieces were sold earlier, and others were stolen. Following a 1978 theft at her estate, involving $1.4 million worth of jewels, Mrs. Gould spoke lightly of the loss. “She used to say, ‚Thank heaven, they only got my everyday jewelry,‘ “

John Young, a director of the Florence J. Gould Foundation, said, adding that the most valuable pieces stolen were a three-strand necklace of 97 pearls, worth almost $700,000, and an 85-pearl chain.

The purpose of the foundation, which benefits from most of Mrs. Gould’s $100 million estate, is to foster French-American amity. Mrs. Gould, who was born in San Francisco and studied opera before she became Mr. Gould’s third wife in 1923, died without heirs.

The star among the 87 offerings in the sale is a sapphire necklace valued at as much as $1.5 million. The design began as a simple necklace devised by Van Cleef & Arpels, using a spectacular 114.30-carat sapphire, “The Blue Princess,‘‚ with diamonds.
Mrs. Gould subsequently made “The Blue Princess“ the center of an assemblage of sapphires and diamonds, a necklace that she styled and Georges Bidault, a jeweler with a workshop outside Paris, fabricated.

Second only in value to the sapphire is the “Victory“ diamond, 31.35 carats, mounted as a ring, which was named for the Allied victory in World War II because the rough stone from which it was cut was discovered in Sierre Leone in 1945 at the end of the war.
The rough stone was the third- largest ever found in Africa. The ring is estimated to sell for up to $700,000.

Mrs. Gould had a passion for pearls, and more than one superb necklace remains.
A pearl and diamond fringe necklace by Alexander Reza, a Paris jeweler on the Place Vendome is estimated to sell for up to $300,000.
“If we had five of them, we could sell them all, so strong is the interest,“ Francois Curiel, Christie’s jewelry specialist, said. Mr. Reza also fashioned for Mrs. Gould an emerald-bead necklace of carved fluted stones, the size of marbles, which is estimated to bring up to $220,000.

She wore diamonds from head to toe – as Mr. Curiel discovered when he checked her closets and found a pair of diamond clips on her shoes. She wore fakes too – there are three fake diamonds, two fake sapphires and an ersatz emerald in the sale. The fakes and the fish – there are numerous fish-shape pins, crafted of sapphires and diamonds, and of ivory, diamonds and emeralds – are, according to Christie’s, attracting the most interest among lower-price offerings in the sale.

On April 12, 1984 her jewelry was sold  for $8 million, the highest price then ever reached at auction for a single collection of jewelry.

 

Jewelry Collections Of Prominent Women

Jewelry that was owned by three other women who were prominent in their careers and as hostesses will be offered next week in three sales at Sotheby’s, York Avenue at 72d Street. Eleanor (Cissy) Medill Patterson, publisher of The Washington Herald until her death in 1948, was partial to the black-pearl necklace and earrings that will be sold next Thursday at 2 P.M.

Miss Patterson bought the string of 22 natural black pearls, separated by diamonds, with matching ear clips in 1934, when she saw them in the window at Cartier in New York.

According to an account in “Cissy,“ a biography of the publisher by Paul Healy, Cartier had just acquired the jewelry from Prince Youssoupoff, a Romanov, who told Jacques Cartier that two of the pearls had belonged to Catherine the Great.
Miss Patterson left the pearls to Evie Robert, a friend, who was a columnist, and whose daughter Alice Birney Robert Jones is the consignor. Sotheby’s expects the pearls will bring as much as $200,000.

Following the death in 1975 of Perle Mesta, the celebrated party giver who was Minister to Luxembourg under President Harry S. Truman, her jewelry was purchased by an antiques dealer, who sold it to a collector.
Now the collector, who has not been identified, is selling Mrs. Mesta’s suite of aquamarine and diamond jewelry, comprising a necklace, pendant, ear clips and brooch (up to $30,000), and an emerald and diamond brooch (up to $20,000). These will also be auctioned.

Thank you to Laura!

Royal Wuerttemberg Topaz Parure | Imperial Wedding Present | Napoleons Hochzeitsgeschenk

Napoleons Imperiales Brautgeschenk Rosa Topase | Pink Topaz Parure | Princess Paul of Württemberg - Princess Charlotte of Saxe Hildburghausen
Napoleons Imperiales Brautgeschenk Rosa Topase | Pink Topaz Parure | Princess Paul of Württemberg – Princess Charlotte of Saxe Hildburghausen

Zitat aus Kaiser Napoleons Briefe an die Kaiserin Josephine im November 1805 aus Wien nach Strassburg……..

„Ich schreibe an Herrn von Harville, dass Du nach Baden abreisen und Dich von dort nach Stuttgart und München begeben sollst.

In Stuttgart überreichst Du der Prinzessin Paul das Brautgeschenk.

Es genügt, wenn Du für 20 000 Franken in den Korb (Corbeille de Mariage) tust, das Übrige ist für die Geschenke, die Du in München den Töchtern der Kurfürstin von Bayern machst.

Nimm auch das Nötige mit, um den Damen und Offizieren, die den Dienst bei Dir versehen werden, Geschenke zu machen. Benimm Dich recht würdig, aber lass Dir alle Huldigungen gefallen: man ist Dir alles schuldig. Während Du nur Höflichkeit zu geben hast……………“

Prinzessin Charlotte von SachsenHildburghausen, heiratete 1805 den Prinzen Paul von Württemberg (1785-1852) und wurde damals „Prinzessin Paul“ genannt.

Prinzessin Paul, Prinzessin Charlotte von Sachsen-Hildburghausen (1787-1847) war eine Tochter von Herzog Friedrich und Herzogin Charlotte, Nichte der Königin Luise von Preußen und Schwester der bekannten Prinzessin Therese – der späteren Königin von Bayern.

Der Braut des bayrischen Kronprinzen Ludwig, der extrem gegen die Verbindung mit Napoleon war. Somit enges Mitglied der Familie, Ihrer zukünftigen Schwiegertochter Prinzessin Auguste Amalia Ludovika von Bayern.

Kaiserin Josephine Sohn, Eugene Beauharnais, heiratete im Januar 1806, in die bayrische Königsfamile,  es wurde  ihr von ihrem taktisch-dynastisch denkenden Mann Napoleon aufgetragen, ein besonderes Geschenk zu machen.

1818 trennte sich das Paar und Charlotte kehrte nach Hildburghausen zurück. Sie hatten zusammen fünf überlebende Kinder.

Die älteste Tochter war  Prinzessin Charlotte(1807–1873), später Großfürstin Helene Pawlowna ⚭ 1824 Großfürst Michael Pawlowitsch (1798–1849) sie war durch die großzügigen Brautgeschenke und Brautausstattung  auch für angeheiratete Bräute, der Familie Romanov,  mit Juwelen und Schmuck, versorgt.

Ihr ältester Sohn Prinz Friedrich von Württemberg 1808-1870 heiratete am 20. November 1845 seine Cousine Prinzessin Katharina von Württemberg (1821–1898), eine Tochter von König Wilhelm I.  Er erbte von seiner Mutter den Hochzeitsschmuck – die Topazparure.

Das einzige Kind aus dieser Verbindung war der 1848 in Stuttgart geborene Prinz Wilhelm, der 1891 als Wilhelm II. König von Württemberg wurde.

Im Jahr 1877 heiratete Prinz Wilhelm Prinzessin Marie zu Waldeck und Pyrmont.

Princess Marie of Wurtemberg Pink Topaz Parure Tiara Napoleons wedding present
Princess Marie of Wurtemberg Pink Topaz Parure Tiara Napoleons wedding present to Princess Paul of Wurtemberg

Und hier ging nun die imperiale Topaz Parure an  Prinzessin Marie.

Das Paar hatte drei Kinder, von denen zwei nicht über das Säuglingsalter hinaus kamen. Lediglich die Tochter Prinzessin Pauline (1877–1965), wurde erwachsen und später die Gemahlin von Fürst Friedrich zu Wied (1872–1945).

Im April 1882 verstarb Prinzessin Marie während der Entbindung von Ihrem dritten Kind, das bei seiner Geburt nicht lebensfähig war.

Die Topazparure mit Topas-Tiara, zwei Topas Armbändern, Topas Broschen, Topas Ohrringen und Topas Halsband alles mit Diamanten und rosa Topasen besetzt ging an Tochter Prinzessin Pauline, der späteren Fürstin Wied.

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Zum Vergleich: die Kosten für die Erstellung der Saphir Parure der Kaiserin Josephine, wurde 1805, mit ca 84 000 Franc angegeben. Diese bestand jedoch noch zusätzlich zu der Tiara, Halsband und Armbändern aus einem Gürtel, einem Kamm und mehreren Broschen und Ohrringen.

 

Die berühmten Rosa Topase |Königlicher Schmuck der Prinzessin Marie von Württemberg

>>Pink Topaz Diamond Tiara | Royal Württemberg Diamant Topas Diadem

>>Rosa Topas Diadem im Etui | The pink topaz tiara in the box

>>Rosa Topas Diamant Armbänder| Royal Pink Topaz and Diamond Bracelet

>>Pink Topaz Diamond Necklace | Rose Topase Halsschmuck mit Diamanten

>>Rosa Topase als Parure | Royal Pink Topaz Parure with Diamond

>>Rose Topas Brosche /Devante de Corsage with Diamonds| German Deutschland| Royal Jewel History

Pink Topaz Grand Parure | Empress Marie Louise of France | Tiara, Collier, Bracelet, Guirdle, Comb with Topaz| Joaillerie Marie Louise impératrice des Français

Pink Topaz Parure with Diamonds | Empress Marie Louise of France | Rosa Topase Diadem, Kamm, Halsband,Gürtel | Joaillerie Marie Louise impératrice des Français

 

 

 

Quote from Emperor Napoleon’s letters to Empress Josephine in November 1805 in Strasbourg……….

„I write to Mr. von Harville that you should leave for Baden and go from there to Stuttgart and Munich.

In Stuttgart you present the bridal present to Princess Paul.

It is enough if you put it in the basket (Corbeille de Mariage) for 20,000 francs, the rest is for the gifts you give in Munich to the daughters of the Elector of Bavaria.

Take with you what is necessary to give gifts to the ladies and officers who will serve you. Behave in a dignified manner, but be willing to accept all homages: they owe you everything.

Princess Charlotte von Sachsen-Hildburghausen, married Prince Paul von Württemberg (1785-1852) in 1805 and was then called „Princess Paul“.

Princess Paul, Princess Charlotte of Saxon-Hildburghausen (1787-1847) was a daughter of Duke Friedrich and Duchess Charlotte, niece of Queen Luise of Prussia and sister of the famous Princess Therese –  later  the Queen of Bavaria.

The bride of the Bavarian crown prince Ludwig, who was against the connection with Napoleon.

Thus close member of the family, her future daughter-in-law Princess Auguste Amalia Ludovika of Bavaria.

Empress Josephine’s son, Eugene Beauharnais, married in January 1806, into the Bavarian royal family. Her tactically dynastic husband Napoleon instructed her to make a special gift.

In 1818 the couple separated and Charlotte returned to Hildburghausen. Together they had five surviving children.

The eldest daughter was Princess Charlotte (1807-1873), later Grand Duchess Helene Pavlovna ⚭ 1824 Grand Duchess Michael Pavlovich (1798-1849) she was provided with jewels and jewellery by the generous bridal gifts and bridal equipment also for married brides, the Romanov family.

Her eldest son Prince Friedrich von Württemberg 1808-1870 married on November 20, 1845 his cousin Princess Katharina von Württemberg (1821-1898), a daughter of King Wilhelm I. He inherited from his mother the wedding jewellery – the Topazparure.

The only child from this marriage was Prince Wilhelm, born 1848 in Stuttgart, who became King of Württemberg in 1891 as Wilhelm II.

In 1877 Prince Wilhelm married Princess Marie zu Waldeck and Pyrmont. This marriage with a small princely house, a marriage of affection, met with little enthusiasm in Württemberg.

Princess Marie of Wurtemberg Pink Topaz Parure Tiara Napoleons wedding present to Princess Paul of Wurtemberg

And here the imperial Topaz Parure went to Princess Marie.

The couple had three children, two of whom did not go beyond infancy. Only the daughter Princess Pauline (1877-1965) grew up and later the wife of Prince Friedrich zu Wied (1872-1945).

In April 1882 Princess Marie died giving birth to her third child, who was not viable at birth.

The topaz parure with topaz tiara, two topaz bracelets, topaz brooches, topaz earrings and topaz collar all set with diamonds and pink topazes went to daughter Princess Pauline, later Princess Wied.

 

CARTIER Emerald Pendant Brooch | Maharaja of Mandi

Emerald Diamond Pendant Brooch Cartier| Maharaja of Mandi Royal India Ruler
Emerald Diamond Pendant Brooch Cartier| Maharaja of Mandi Royal India Ruler

Raja Sir Joginder Sen Bahadur, 18th Raja of Mandi 1913/1986.

Son of Mian Kishan Singh Sahib, born 20 August 1904, educated at Queen Mary’s College and Aitchison College, Lahore; Indian Ambassador to Brazil 1952/56; Member of Lok Sabha 1957/62; Honorary Lt.-Col. 3rd/17th Dogra Regiment and Bengal Sappers and Miners.

Married 1stly, about 1911, a daughter of Thakur Devi Singh of Delath.
Married 2ndly, 8 February 1923, HH Rani Amrit Kaur, born 1904, died 1948, daughter of Col. HH Farzand i-Dilband Rasikhul-Itiqad Daulat-i-Inglishia *Raja-i-Rajgan Maharaja Sir Jagatjit Singh Bahadur of Kapurthala, and his wife, Rani Kanari.

Married 3rdly, 13 May 1930, Kumari Kusum Kumari [HH Rani Kusum Kumari of Mandi], born 27 August 1913, died June 1998, daughter of Kunwar Prithiraj Sinhji of Rajpipla, and had issue, two sons and two daughters. He died 16 June 1986.

Cartier Emerald Pendant Brooch | Raja of Mandi Maharaja and Royal Ruler of India
Cartier Emerald Pendant Brooch | Raja of Mandi Maharaja and Royal Ruler of India

Above in the picture, the Raja, in 1930 when he married Rani Kusum Kumari of Mandi, wearing the important emerald jewel pendant.

Important emerald and diamond pendant/brooch combination, Cartier, 1927.

The surmount set with a carved emerald flower, framed with circular-cut diamonds, supporting a plaque set with an hexagonal polished emerald and calibré-cut emeralds, supporting three emerald drops with onyx rondelle crowns and circular-cut diamond terminals, unsigned, brooch fitting detachable, one small emerald deficient.

The pendant will be  offered at auction by Sotheys, Geneve November 2019. Accompanied by SSEF report no. 108686, stating that the emeralds are of Colombian origin, with a minor to a moderate amount of oil in fissures.

 

Cartier’s use of mughal stones in jewellery was an important aspect of their Indian style, these designs were dominant between 1913 and 1930.

Raja is a title for a monarch equivalent to king or princely ruler in the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia.

This pendant also calls to mind the brooch worn by Marjorie Merriweather Post, captured in a painting by Giulio de Blaas in 1929.

Danke an Volker für den Tipp.

 

Raja of Mandi Emerald-Diamond-Pearl-Bandeau Cartier | Mughal Jewelry| Royal India

Raja of Mandi Emerald-Diamond Pendant Cartier | Mughal Jewelry| Royal India

CARTIER Emerald Pendant Brooch | Royal Jewel India| Raja of Mandi

Cartier Sautoir with Emerald Diamond Pendant Brooch | Raja of Mandi Maharaja and Royal Ruler of India| Maharajah Mughal Jewelry| Royal India| Jewel history

Cartier Orginal Sautoir of Emerald Diamonds with Emerald Pendant Brooch | Raja of Mandi Maharaja and Royal Ruler of India| Maharajah Mughal Jewelry

Countess Maria Walewska Corsage Ornament| Sapphire Brooch | Napoleon Bonaparte | Royal Imperial Jewels History

Countess Maria Walewska Corsage Ornament| Sapphire Brooch | Napoleon Bonaparte | Royal Imperial Jewels History
Countess Maria Walewska Corsage Ornament| Sapphire Brooch | Napoleon Bonaparte | Royal Imperial Jewels History

this impressive stomacher pin was given by Napoleon I (1769-1821), Emperor of the French from 1804 until 1814 and again briefly in 1815 during the Hundred Days, to Countess Maria Walewska (1786-1817).

Napoleons Love Token!

The motif surmounting the central sapphire is a Roman Helmet, alluding to Napoleon’s wish to associate himself with the great rulers of the Roman Empire.

Other emblems, including two crossed canons, a drum and lances demonstrate further Napoleon’s desire to represent military strength.
To the right of the central sapphire is a monogram depicting a ‘WN’ entwined, alluding to the Emperor and the Countess Waleska.
It is believed that the ruby-eyed eagle, surmounting the piece represents the Imperial Eagle.
However, it is not depicted in the usual proud stance, instead it is a recumbent eagle, considered to provide a form of protection to the rest of the jewel, and therefore to the person it is given to.

The story behind the jewel, more history:

Countess Maria Walewska Corsage Ornament| Sapphire Brooch | Napoleon Bonaparte | Royal Imperial Jewels History

Dame Nellie Melba | Belle Epoque Turquoise and Diamond Stomacher Brooch Cartier| Noble Jewel History

Dame Nellie Melba | BELLE EPOQUE TURQUOISE AND DIAMOND BROOCHES| Noble Jewel History
Dame Nellie Melba | BELLE EPOQUE TURQUOISE AND DIAMOND BROOCH| Noble Jewel History

From the collection of 1861-1931 Nellie Melba:

Belle époque TURQUOISE AND DIAMOND BROOCH
Cabochon turquoises, rose and old-cut diamonds, platinum and gold, 1910s, 16.0 cm, red Cartier case offered on auction at Geneve Nov 2019 by Christie’s  Est.  $250,000-350,000

Click for more history:

 Dame Nellie Melba | Belle Epoque Turquoise and Diamond Stomacher Brooch Cartier| Noble Jewel History

Dame Nellie Melba | Belle Epoque Turquoise and Diamond Brooches Cartier | Noble Jewel History

From the jewelry collection of DAME NELLIE MELBA

BELLE EPOQUE TURQUOISE AND DIAMOND BROOCHES
Cabochon turquoises, rose and old-cut diamonds, detachable brooch fttings, with interchangeable central collets and additional half-pearl fittings , 1910s, 11.0 cm and 5.2 cm, red Cartier case

Christie’s will be offered  in Geneve Nov 2019 this jewelry $150,000-200,000

click for more history:

Dame Nellie Melba | Belle Epoque Turquoise and Diamond Brooches Cartier | Noble Jewel History

Dame Nellie Melba | Belle Epoque Turquoise and DiamondBrooches Cartier| Noble Jewel History
Dame Nellie Melba | Belle Epoque Turquoise and Diamond Brooches Cartier| Noble Jewel History

Large Kokoshnik Cartier Diamond Tiara | Granard Jewels | Beatrice Ogden Mills|Forbes Family Jewel|Countess of Granard

Grosser Kokoshnik Cartier Diamant Tiara | Granard Juwelen Schmuck| Beatrice Ogden Mills| Forbes Familien Juwelen|Countess of Granard Large Kokoshnik Cartier Diamond Tiara | Granard Jewels | Beatrice Ogden Mills|Forbes Family Jewel|Countess of Granard
Grosser Kokoshnik Cartier Diamant Tiara | Granard Juwelen Schmuck| Beatrice Ogden Mills| Forbes Familien Juwelen|Countess of Granard Large Kokoshnik Cartier Diamond Tiara | Granard Jewels | Beatrice Ogden Mills|Forbes Family Jewel|Countess of Granard

 

 

Oben abgebildet, Beatrice Mills, Countess Granard mit ihrem großen Diamant Kokoshnik, aus dem Jahr 1937.

Einem wahrhaft prächtigen Diadem mit orientalischer Inspiration, der für sie, bei CARTIER angefertigt wurde.
Seine geschwungene Linie wird durch parallele Reihen betont. Brillanten, Diamanten und birnenförmige Steine von hohem Wert sind in das Design integriert; einige sind Altschliff, sowie alte grosse Diamanten, die müssen aus der Sammlung der Familie Granard stammen.
Sie war Stammkundin von Cartier London und eine der letzten großen Käuferinnen  eines Kokosniks.
Sie bestellte einen Kokoshnik im Jahr 1922, einen anderen 1923 und einen dritten Kokosnik 1937 – den letzten, oben im Bild, für die Krönung von König Georg.
Beatrice Countess von Granard 1883-1972, geboren als Beatrice Mills, Tochter des großen amerikanischen Financier und Bankiers Ogden Mills.  Eine berühmte Gastgeberin, Rennstallbesitzerin und Pferde-Züchterin, die als erste Frau den Grand Prix gewann, Sie  heiratete 1909 den 8. Earl of Granard. Sie lebte zwischen London, Paris und Castle Forbes in Irland.

Der Aufenthaltsort des Diadems ist unbekannt.
Drei der fünf Art Deco Diamantbroschen, die Teil des Diadems waren, sind bekannt>>>>

 

 

Granard Jewels | Beatrice Ogden Mills| Forbes Family Jewelry |Countess of Granard| Wedding Gifts

Cartier Diamond Tiara | Granard Jewels | Beatrice Ogden Mills| Forbes Family Jewel |Countess of Granard

Emerald Necklace Persian Style Fringe Collier | Noble Jewels Countess Granard

Large Kokoshnik | Cartier Diamond Tiara | Granard Jewels | Beatrice Ogden Mills|Forbes Family Jewel|Countess of Granard

Diamond Brooches from the large Kokoshnik |Cartier Diamond Tiara | Granard Jewels | Forbes Family Jewel History |Countess of Granard

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Royal Pink Topaz Tiara | Princess Margaret of Hesse

Royal Topas and Diamond Tiara Margaret Geddes Prinzessin Ludwig von HessenPrincess Ludwig of Hesse
Royal Pink Topaz and Diamond Tiara | Margaret Geddes, Prinzessin Ludwig von Hessen |Princess Ludwig of Hesse Royal Imperial Jewels History

The story behind pink topaz tiara, with vine leaves.

click for more history:

Royal Topaz and Diamond Tiara |Margaret Geddes

Princess Margaret von Hessen und bei Rhein|Princess Ludwig of Hesse